The top three literary journeys into the world of casinos

Friday, Aug 26, 2016 12:55

The Gambler by Fyodor Dostoyevsky


Dostoyevsky was fond of roulette, which influenced his idea to write the book The Gambler. The Russian author tells the story of a young tutor, Alexey Ivanovitch, working in the household of a wealthy general. Ivanovitch is magically drawn to playing and betting, the thrill of the exhilaration of winning and the despair when losing. Dostoyevsky captures these complex human emotions in a way in which only a literary great, and a gambler himself, could. Make sure to get a good translation, such as Constance Garnett's.

Casino Royale by Ian Fleming


Ian Fleming’s first James Bond novel is a must on any casino-themed book list. Aside from an insight into the fictional world of spies and their enthralling carry-on at the French establishment, Casino Royale, Fleming’s book offers insight into the 1960ies. Casino Royale was the first book, which used brand placement. Bond lights branded cigarette after cigarette, and sucks the smoke deep into his lung – oh, the joy of reading of a past era!

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson


To many, author Hunter Thompson evokes a mixture of love and hate emotions. The gonzo-journalist is terribly self-indulgent; yet, his semi-autobiographical account of the fictional characters, Raoul Duke and Dr Gonzo, and their drug-fuelled ‘American dream’ of a road trip to the desert of Las Vegas is exceptionally well-written. He draws readers into the book’s little stories, these often play in the Bazooko Casino, where the pair plays its cards sometimes right, but often wrong.

Don’t have a gamble when it comes to books.